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25 February 2020

Modelling associations between neurocognition and functional course in young people with emerging mental disorders: a longitudinal cohort study

We caught up with Jacob Crouse from the University of Sydney’s Brain and Mind Centre to discuss his research into key factors that underpin mental health disorders in young people, with a view to improving outcomes. 


29 January 2020

Why does PSYSCAN use CANTAB?

PSYSCAN is a global project, which aims to develop a neuroimaging-based tool that will help healthcare professionals to address key clinical issues for patients with psychotic disorders. We caught up with study coordinator – Aimée Westerveld – to find out more about the role of CANTAB in the project. 

15 January 2020

What is the impact of stress and environment on executive function and motivation for primary school children?

We caught up with Toby Bartle, Registered Psychologist and PhD Candidate at James Cook University, to find out why he chose CANTAB when looking at the impact of stress and environment on executive function and motivation for primary school children.

9 December 2019

What is the impact of hydration status and exercise on cognitive performance?

We caught up with University of Ulster researcher, Kyle Wallace, to find out why he chose CANTAB to investigate the links between cognitive function, hydration status and martial arts. 

19 November 2019

Using CANTAB to characterize the development of cognition in a longitudinal neuroimaging cohort of healthy adolescents

Dr Qiang Luo, Associate Principal Investigator at the Institute of Science and Technology for Brain-inspired Intelligence - Fudan University, shared the role that CANTAB played in his latest publication: Adolescent binge drinking disrupts normal trajectories for brain functional organization and personality maturation.

5 November 2019

Busting the myth that pen-and-paper is better than electronic outcome assessments

Clinical outcome assessments administered with pen-and-paper tasks have long been the assessment method of choice for measuring treatment effects on patients. However, with the advent of electronic alternatives - how do these two assessment methods compare?

11 October 2019

How to choose the right assessment of social cognition for your study

The Emotion Recognition Task (ERT) and Emotion Bias Task (EBT) both assess social cognition, but which is more appropriate for different participant groups?

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